F. and S. Marriott 140 Newbegin, Hornsea, England, HU18 1PB

May 2010. Stephanie died peacefully on 19th April after a short stay in hospital. She had been suffering from acute cervical cancer. Fred will continue to run the business to the best of his ability. The web site is slowly getting under control again as he tries to take over some of Stephanie's responsibilities, and learns some of the mysteries of Dreamweaver.

Pieces An on-line look at cameras etc. by Stephanie Marriott

Introduction

Canon 318

Canon 518

Canon 814

Canon 1218

Canon Zoom 250

Canon 1014

Canon 512XL

Canon 514XL

Canon 310XL

Canon Camera Designations

Filter Sizes

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December 1999

Introduction. Super-8 was introduced in 1965. Canon was already making high-quality Standard-8 cine cameras and it was not long before they had entered the Super-8 market. By 1967 Canon had three Super-8 cine cameras available in the UK - the Canon 318, 518 and 814.

The 318 is the most compact of the three original Canon Super-8 cameras, with a 10 mm. to 30 mm. f/1.8 zoom lens, reflex viewfinder and automatic metering. The camera films at 18 f.p.s. only and does not have single frame. In 1967 it cost almost £70. This version of the 318 disappeared very quickly. A new 318, the 318M, appeared in the UK in about 1973. It has a similar specification to the original 318 but has single frame. In 1973 it cost almost £60. The 318MB has a different body (black) but in other respects has the same specification as the 318M. It cost about £75 in 1976.

The 518 has a 9.5 mm. to 47.5 mm. f/1.8 zoom lens, reflex viewfinder with microprism rangefinder and automatic metering. Like the 318, it has only one filming speed (18 f.p.s.) and no single frame. In 1967 it cost almost £90. In 1968 a slightly improved version, the Auto Zoom 518, was introduced which had 36 f.p.s. and a power zoom. It cost almost £100. Both of these cameras had disappeared from the UK market by 1975.

The 518 SV was introduced to the UK in about 1971, when it cost almost £150. The lens specification is the same as the Auto Zoom 518 but the camera has a fully-closing iris for fades, and the viewfinder includes over/under exposure warning signals. The filming speeds are 18 and 24 f.p.s. and slow motion, and single frame. In 1971 this camera cost almost £150. The 518 series ended in about 1976 (at least in the UK).

The 814 has a 7.5 mm. to 60 mm. f/1.4 power zoom lens, reflex viewfinder and automatic or manual exposure. It has 12, 18 and 24 f.p.s. and a remote release socket for single frame. In 1967 it cost over £165. The 814E (picture) is very similar but has slow motion (approx. 40 f.p.s.). In 1973 it cost almost £220. The 814 XL Electronic appeared in about 1977. It has a variable shutter which can be set to 150 degrees for normal use and 220 degrees for low-light use as well as closing fully for fades. The reflex focusing has a split-image rangefinder and warning lamps in the viewfinder indicate over/under exposure, film transport and end of film. It has automatic exposure with manual override. FIlm speeds are 9 and 18 f.p.s. plus slow motion (about 36 f.p.s.) and single frame. It has a pulse generator for synchronous sound and in 1978 it cost amost £314.

The 1218 was introduced to the UK in about 1968. It has a 7.5 mm. to 90 mm. f/1.8 zoom lens with two speed power zoom, 18 f.p.s and approx. 54 f.p.s. slow motion, automatic exposure with manual override and reflex viewing with a microprism rangefinder. In 1968 it cost almost £400. It did not sell well and is now comparatively rare. It disappeared from the UK market in about 1975.

The Canon Zoom 250 is a simple camera with a 10.8 mm. to 27 mm. f/1.8 zoom lens, automatic exposure and zone focusing. It has 18 f.p.s. only and no single frame. Introduced to the UK in about 1969, it cost about £60. It disappeared from the UK about two years later.

In our opinion one of the best of all the Canon Super-8 cameras is the Canon 1014, with 7 mm. to 70 mm. f/1.4 power zoom, reflex viewfinder with split-image rangefinder and automatic exposure with manual override. It has 18 and 24 f.p.s., slow motion (approx. 54 f.p.s.) and single frame. Up to 60 frames limited backwind permits automatic lap dissolves. In 1974 the 1014E cost almost £400.

The Canon 512 XL was the first of the Canon available light cameras to come to the UK, appearing in about 1975 when it cost about £185. It has a 9.5 mm. to 47.5 mm. f/1.2 zoom lens, with a reflex viewfinder and split-image rangefinder. It has 9 and 18 f.p.s. plus slow motion (approx. 36 f.p.s.) and single frame. It has automatic exposure and limited fade capability.

This available light camera was joined by others the following year. The Canon 514 XL has a 9 mm. to 45 mm. f/1.4 zoom lens with reflex viewfinder and split-image rangefinder. It has 18 f.p.s., single frame, and automatic exposure. In 1976 it cost over £140.

The Canon 310 XL is another of our favourite cameras and one which we use fairly often. It has a 8.5 mm. to 25.5 mm. f/1.0 zoom lens with reflex viewfinder but no rangefinder. It has a plastic body which makes it quite light and easy to carry, 18 f.p.s., single frame, and automatic exposure. In 1976 it cost over £100.

By 1977, sound cameras were beginning to take over the Super-8 market and Canon developed sound versions of many of their best Super-8 silent cameras. However, sound film is no longer available so I have not bothered with listing the sound models. Most the developments of the silent range had happened by 1977 although there were some small variations later.

 

Most Canon Super-8 cine cameras (the 250 is the only exception) have a number which identifies the lens specification; the first digit (or two digits in a four digit number) identify the zoom ratio and the last two digits give the lens maximum aperture. For example, the 318 has a 3 to 1 f/1.8 zoom, the 518 has a 5 to 1 f/1.8 zoom and so on. The 1014 has a 10 to 1 f/1.4 zoom lens.

Filter sizes.

All filters are screw fitting except Series IV. This is the only filter size information I have for these cameras.

310XL

8.5 mm to 25.5 mm f/1.0

43 mm.

AF310XL

8.5 mm to 25.5 mm f/1.0

43 mm.

AF310XL-S

8.5 mm to 25.5 mm f/1.0

43 mm.

514XL

9 mm. to 45 mm. f/1.4

43 mm.

514XL-S

9 mm. to 45 mm. f/1.4

43 mm.

AF514XL-S

9 mm. to 45 mm. f/1.4

52 mm.

814XL-S

7 mm. to 56 mm. f/1.4

62 mm.

1014XL-S

6.5 mm. to 65 mm. f/1.4

72 mm.

Autozoom 1218

7.5 mm. to 90 mm. f/1.8

Series IV

Autozoom 814 Electric

7.5 mm. to 60 mm. f/1.4

58 mm.

Autozoom 1014 Electric

7 mm. to 70 mm. f/1.4

58 mm.

Autozoom 512XL Electric

9.5 mm. to 47.5 mm. f/1.2

48 mm.

Autozoom 518SV

9.5 mm. to 47.5 mm. f/1.8

48 mm.

Autozoom 518

9.5 mm. to 47.5 mm. f/1.8

48 mm.

Autozoom 318M

10 mm. to 30 mm. f/1.8

40 mm.

Single-8 518 SV

9.5 mm. to 47.5 mm. f/1.8

48 mm.

Australian Prices: All 1981. Canon 318M - $150; Canon 310XL - $250; Canon 514XL - $330. 

Note: I like to give price information in both sterling and American dollars. However, this information is not always available to me, in which case I use whichever I can get. I do not convert from one currency to the other; market conditions vary and camera prices were often very different in the U.S.A. and Britain, so conversion would not give an accurate picture.

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